Georgina Wainwright
Registered Dietitian
Tel: 07940 816728, E-mail: somersetdietitian@gmail.com

How I can help you


If ………..

 

You have been diagnosed with a medical condition, such as diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease etc
You would like advice about eating disorders
You suffer with digestive problems
Your child has special nutritional requirements
You need to lose weight in a safe and sensible way
You have oral or enteral nutrition requirements  
You need to put weight on following an illness
You want to improve your athletic performance or general fitness
You want advice about breastfeeding and weaning
You want to maximise your chances to become pregnant
You are a carer and want reliable, practical advice to ensure the person/s you are caring for is/are getting an adequate nutritional intake

 
I can help.

Eating disorders


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“An eating disorder is a failed solution to a problem”. Treatment is available. Dietetic education and therapy can play an important part in engaging and motivating somebody to change. The support of family or friends is invaluable and information specifically to help them support eating and drinking can lead to better outcomes.  NICE May 2017 guidance recommends that a registered dietitian should be part of the team supporting somebody with an eating disorder.
Eating disorders are a range of conditions that can affect someone psychologically, physically, and socially. They include anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder. Although serious, eating disorders are treatable conditions and full recovery is possible. The sooner someone gets the treatment they need, the more likely they are to make a full recovery. Dietetic advice can be part of the treatment but cannot be the only treatment. Alongside dietetic therapy physical monitoring and psychological therapy are essential. So consultations would include discussions about where somebody is considering or accessing this support.
How I can help with an eating disorder?
With a dietetic assessment of;
• current and previous dietary intake, eating habits and weight history
• other eating disorder behavior e.g. purging, use of laxatives and diuretics
• current nutritional knowledge and dietary rules e.g. calorie counting, times of eating, ritualistic behaviors and avoidance of food groups
• activity level and exercise
• motivation to change and your aims of treatment
• calculation of nutritional requirements for weight maintenance and weight gain (if required)
• developing a shared nutritional treatment plan

Nutrition Education

Nutrition education is often overlooked. People with eating disorders are often overly concerned with small aspects of nutrition such as calorie counting, avoiding fats. This can lead to a distorted view of nutritional requirements. I can help somebody reflect on their current physical health and relate this to their dietary intake and question their dietary “rules”. This can be an important step in motivating dietary change.

Physical Monitoring

Physical monitoring is essential for somebody with an eating disorder. The frequency and physical monitoring plan e.g. bloods, blood pressure, temperature etc. is usually recommended by their GP.

Psychological Therapies

Recommended psychological therapy for an eating disorder differs depending on the diagnosis.
More information on physical monitoring and psychological treatments is available from Beat, an eating disorder charity registered in England and Wales (801343) b-eat.co.uk or 0345 634 1414.



Mental Health Conditions and Diet


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When people are suffering from a mental health condition this can affect their intake. Often they will gain or lose weight, it can be difficult to stay a steady healthy weight. A limited intake or irregular routine can make the symptoms worse. Reviewing the situation and establishing a new, healthier routine can also help give structure to a day to support recovery.

Just ask


Learning Disabilities and Nutrition


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Providing excellent nutrition in a learning disabilities setting can be challenging. The balance between freedom of choice and supporting appropriate nutrition is tricky.
Clients can also be overweight, have diabetes, intolerances etc with special nutritional requirements. Parents and family members may also have introduced specific food routines that they feel benefit the client.
Staff also need support as they will have different levels of knowledge and need to agree a consistent approach to nutrition.
I can provide 1 to 1 reviews for clients or on-site training specifically for your setting. This can include menu planning, nutrition screening, special diets, agreeing consistent policies, supporting discussion where family members have specific beliefs about nutrition.

Just ask


Nursing and residential homes and food provision


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The challenge is in the title, HOME. You are trying to provide excellent meals and snacks that a client would have enjoyed at home and meet their individual nutrition needs.
My parents ran a residential home, I grew up there and witnessed the challenge of devising a menu that everybody would like all of the time, while providing for special dietary needs and family’s expectations.
Staff need support as they will have different levels of knowledge and need to agree a consistent approach to nutrition. They are also responsible for nutrition screening, monitoring nutritional intakes and need to keep up to date with changing policies and nutrition supplements.
I can provide 1 to 1 reviews for clients or on-site training specifically for your setting. This can include menu planning, nutrition screening, special diets, agreeing consistent policies, supporting discussion where family members have specific beliefs about food.

Just ask


NHS Trusts


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Need a temporary dietitian?

Waiting times too long?

Staff sickness?

Need somebody for a short term nutrition project?

Looking for somebody for Somerset or the surrounding area?

Save on agency fees.

Just ask.


Work Place Dietetics


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One in six people live with a long term health condition like diabetes, heart disease and 2/3 of the UK adult population is overweight. (NHS data 2014) This could be contributing to absenteeism and reduced productivity.
Offering work based dietetic sessions 1 to 1s, nutrition training or considering healthier catering options can help employees feel supported in making changes of benefit to them and the work place.

Just ask.